Posts Tagged ‘iPod Touch’

OnScreen Pitch Count Update 1.4 Now on iTunes App Store

Monday, June 14th, 2010

A new version of OnScreen Pitch Count, the most complete, easy-to-use app for recording baseball pitch results on the iPhone and iPod Touch, is now available. Getting OnScreen Pitch Count to the point where it did its main job well and reliably in a way that was quickly learned was my top priority, and I think I was successful in that right from the first release. With time I’ve been able to add features such as emailing results, including attachments that can be imported into spreadsheets. This new update is more in the nature of a polishing than one that introduces big changes. I’ll just use a few screen shots as the quickest way to point out the differences from earlier versions. I recommend downloading the new User Guide for more complete details.

An obvious difference to anyone that’s used the app before is the presence of a toolbar at the top of the different screens of the app. The main screen in which pitch data is entered is shown below. The four toolbar buttons with titles, none of which are used for recording pitch results, were formerly elsewhere on the screen and just do what they always have. The totally new control is the one with the opened lock icon on the left of the bar. A bit below it, in the top yellow region, is a closed lock, which indicates that the screen is locked, its normal condition. As one might expect, tapping the button unlocks the screen and changes the icon indicating the lock state to show an open lock. So what does unlocking do? Two things really. First, it makes it possible to edit the pitcher’s name. Previously, once the name had been entered and saved it couldn’t be changed. Obviously, there are times you might want to change the name, including of course when you’ve misspelled the name for some reason, but also when you’ve only learned the pitcher’s name sometime after the game started, or even after it ended. Unlocking allows you to change the pitcher’s name both during the course of the game or later when you’re reviewing it.

The other thing unlocking does is to make it possible to terminate an inning before three outs have been recorded. This is something that comes up in leagues with limits on runs scored or total batters in an inning. Having coached in a minor Little League that only allowed a team to bat once through its complete order in an inning, I should have thought of this myself, but I had it pointed out to me by a user who coaches a Little League team in Texas. Thanks, Daren. Unless the screen is unlocked with the toolbar button, the New Inning and Switch Sides buttons are disabled (as shown) until the third out of the inning has been recorded, in keeping with my philosophy of preventing accidental taps that can mess up pitch recording. But this was a clear case where an override was needed.
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The screen below is one where the pitching results from a game are being reviewed after the game has finished. The toolbar is a bit different from the one already considered. The unlock button allows the editing of the pitcher’s name as before. The Games button is a new one for the app. It allows the user to go directly to the list of recorded games to choose another game to review. This required a couple of steps previously, and the steps were not as obvious as tapping an appropriately labeled button. The Review button is as before. It brings up the complete list of pitchers for which stats were kept in the game. The Done button is to make a new choice to either resume a game, start to record pitches for a new game, or review previous game results (which is what is already being done). Displaying the team name under the pitcher’s name when reviewing a game is also new.
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The screen below shows the list of pitchers with recorded stats for a certain game played last July. Note that the toolbar for this screen also has a Games button, making it easy for you to choose a different game if you decided to do so at this point for some reason. The Cancel button will take you back to whatever screen led to the currently showing one if you want to do that directly.
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The screen below shows an example of a list of games for which pitch results have been recorded. The Cancel and Done buttons have the expected result. The new feature is the addition of an option in the control at the bottom to Edit a game. Select Edit and then tap on a game in order to edit the names of one or both of the teams in that contest.
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All of the new features were requested by users. I think having an easier and more direct and obvious way to navigate from game to game when reviewing pitching performances previously recorded is by far the most important improvement. It was the app’s rather awkward navigation between games and pitchers that caused it to receive a couple of “Great app except for…” reviews. I’m hoping those reviewers will find it in their hearts to review OnScreen Pitch Count again after using this updated version and to give it that extra star in the rating. In any case, I have the satisfaction of knowing I’ve made a good app even better. If you don’t already have it, go check it out on the iTunes App Store.

OnScreen DNA Lite™ for iPhone Now Available

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010

I’m happy to say that OnScreen DNA Lite™ for iPhone can now be downloaded from the iTunes App Store. This is basically a smaller-screen version of the iPad app that was released when the iPad first became available, though adapting the app to the iPhone and iPod Touch required some modifications, which I’ll mention. Everything I said in the blog post “The Thinking Behind the OnScreen DNA Lite™ iPad App” applies to the new iPhone version. The same desire to “provide students (and all persons interested in DNA) with a way to reach a deeper, more intuitive understanding of DNA structure” motivates the development of both apps, and the same care to show DNA’s correct handedness, base-pairs per helical turn, etc. with a ball-and-stick virtual model was taken for each. What’s more, it’s a lot of fun to play with the DNA model through the touch screen control of its orientation and size in both versions of the app.

My last blog post, “An OnScreen DNA Lite™ for iPad Gallery“, showed the screen shots that are a part of the iTunes listing for that app and commented on them. As one way of comparing the two versions, let’s consider the corresponding screen shots for the iPhone app. Below is shown a screen shot from the iPhone version in which the linear (“GCAT”) representation of the base sequences of the DNA model is visible below the model. Because of the smaller screen area of the iPhone, this linear representation of the bases is only shown on demand. The button at the top designated GCAT shows and hides that view. Another accommodation to the smaller screen is the shortening of the DNA model. Instead of the thirty-five base pairs of the iPad model, the iPhone version has twenty-one, which is still sufficient to show adequately the full double helix structure and its features.

gcat

The screen shot below shows the DNA model enlarged (by means of the iPhone pinch-to-zoom technique) and with the linear view of the base sequences hidden. The structure is shown with major and minor grooves as the result of a button tap.

grooves

The next screen shot shows the key to the ball-and-stick model, indicating what each colored ball (molecule) and stick (chemical bond) is meant to represent. This is essentially the same view as the Details popover view in the iPad app.

key

As in the iPad app, one can view a single strand of the DNA model, as shown below. This may be especially useful for grasping the meaning of the handedness of a helix, and the app also allows one to switch back and forth between natural right-handed DNA and imaginary left-handed DNA. The screen shot was taken with the model rotated by means of a finger swipe.

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The screen shot below shows the simulated process of renaturation (rejoining together of the two strands, separated during denaturation) as it nears completion.

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Rather than repeat myself, I’ll just refer the interested reader to my previous two posts for more details about the virtual DNA model of OnScreen DNA Lite for iPad and now iPhone and iPod Touch.

OnScreen Pitch Count 1.3 Is Now on the iTunes App Store

Saturday, March 13th, 2010

A new version of OnScreen Pitch Count (1.3), my iPhone and iPod Touch app for recording, calculating, and reviewing pitch results and stats of baseball and softball games is now available. A major improvement to the app is the new ability to email pitch data from a game as an attached file in csv (comma-separated values) format. The csv format is one easily imported into spreadsheet programs such as Excel. Once you have the data in a spreadsheet, you can perform any of the many operations available, such as totaling the various pitch quantities for the all the pitchers in the game and so on. Also, once the data is in the spreadsheet’s rows and columns, it can be easily transferred by cut and paste to a master spreadsheet you may be maintaining with full season results, for example. The email can be sent with an attachment or with just a text summary of the results without even leaving the app. The attachment feature is one that a few OnScreen Pitch Count users had requested, so I’m glad to have it up and running.

The other major addition is the ability to record wild pitches. There is a new button to tap after a wild pitch occurs. A wild pitch is only recorded when a pitcher throws a ball beyond the catcher’s reach with the result that a base runner is able to advance; so the wild pitch (WP) button is only enabled when there is at least one base runner. This should minimize accidental wild pitch recording. This disabling of the button needs to be taken into account in a couple of instances though. When a runner reaches first base after a missed third strike due to a wild pitch, the user should first put the runner on base with the Other OB button, and then record the wild pitch. If the sole base runner scores on a wild pitch, the wild pitch needs to be recorded before the run is recorded, since that removes the sole runner from the bases and disables the WP button. This is only logical, but might not be obvious the first time. These cases are pointed out in the new pdf User’s Guide for OnScreen Pitch Count available for download online. Wild pitches are common at lower levels of youth baseball and softball, so this can be an important statistic in evaluating how a pitcher is doing and in getting to all the factors that contribute to run scoring.

The screen shots below show the new wild pitch (WP) button and the display for the number of wild pitches. It required a little shifting of buttons and labels around, but the result was good and uncrowded.

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Above is the main screen on which pitch results are recorded by button taps.

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Above is the screen in which cumulative game pitch totals are displayed.

A coach from Texas called me a couple of weeks ago with a question about OnScreen Pitch Count, which he was planning to use in a game that evening. I confess I was jealous. I’m sitting here in New England on a cold, rainy night, knowing baseball and softball are a month away, and with lots of cold rainouts to come even then. Not only that, when the season starts I won’t be getting a team of kids ready as I did for years in the past. It’s a nostalgic time for memories of when my kids were little. My daughter is still playing, a high school sophomore softball pitcher, and I’ll be there in the stands with OnScreen Pitch Count for all the games I can get to. It’s a good feeling to know there are others (though far from enough!) now using this app I created to capture the pitch results that I, as a coach, would have liked to have had.

You can download OnScreen Pitch Count from the iTunes app Store or find out more about it, including a video and the User’s Guide, at nondummies.com. Previous blog posts (“OnScreen Pitch Count: An iPhone App Preview”, “OnScreen Pitch Count Now On Sale on iTunes App Store!”, and “IPhone App Updates and Experiences”) say more about OnScreen Pitch Count and some of my experiences developing and presenting it.

Free! One Week Only—OnScreen GPA Pro

Thursday, February 25th, 2010

OnScreen GPA Pro for iPhone and iPod Touch, the latest app from OnScreen Science, Inc., has been available from the iTunes App Store for a little over a week. This grade-point-average calculator, with an option for multiple students, features customizable calculation formulas and an easy way to make what-if projections of GPA.

The app debuted on what turned out to be a bad day. Usually when an app first appears on the store it gets a chance to be on the first page for apps in its category ordered by release date for a day or two. There were so many apps released on the same day that, due to its assigned time of release, OnScreen GPA Pro ended up near the bottom of page 4 in the Education category from the start and then went to page 9 (virtual oblivion) the next day. It makes a lot of difference from the standpoint of initial sales to be visible on those first couple of days. Having missed that opportunity, OnScreen GPA Pro has had to rely from the start on people using the iTunes search system to come across it. A search on “GPA” brings up several apps, and, as a newcomer, OnScreen GPA Pro is not near the top of the list, not even visible unless the person chooses “Show All,” which makes it less likely people will check out its features to discover the extra power it offers.

One of the things that’s making it harder to even get that initial visibility due to a new release on the iTunes App store is that quite a few developers are releasing suites of apps all at the same time. For example, OnScreen QB Stats got swamped by a slew of apps that just followed NFL players on Twitter. There was a separate app for each team! OnScreen GPA Pro ran into a couple of foreign language series. I wish Apple would come up with a way to show a suite of apps as a single entry.

Since I last wrote about OnScreen GPA Pro, I’ve made a four-minute video to illustrate how it works. Also note that the OnScreen GPA Pro User’s Guide is online.

In order to get OnScreen GPA Pro onto more iPhones and iPod Touches and hopefully to thereby generate some good word-of-mouth (or blog) advertising, I’m making the app free for a week. Just go here and download it. If you like OnScreen GPA Pro, I hope you’ll rate it and perhaps write a brief review. If you don’t like it—and especially if you encounter a problem—please email me about it, whether or not you rate it.

Tell anyone you know who might be interested in having an easy way of calculating GPA and having handy access to GPA records about this limited-time free download.

OnScreen GPA Pro: An iPhone App Preview

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

My very long absence from this blog has been due once again to work on an iPhone app, but I plan to take a break from coding, assuming the app, which I just submitted to Apple for approval today, doesn’t require quick revision. As the title of this post no doubt indicated to anyone potentially interested in the app, it is an app that calculates grade point averages, universally known as GPA among those concerned with them. My first encounter with the concept was as a college undergraduate. My high school had kept what amounted to an equivalent sort of average, the one where an A was a 95 and so on. In college, where courses might have different credit values assigned to them, a different method was needed, based on the idea that, for example, making an A in a 4 credit course and a B in a 3 credit course was a better result than if the grades for the two courses were swapped. So grade points were assigned by multiplying the worth of the grade times the credits for the course, with an A being worth 4, a B worth 3, and so on. Add the grade points up and divide by the sum of the credit values of the courses to obtain the GPA. For historical accuracy, I should state that the University of Texas in my day used a 3 point maximum (for all A’s) system, but the principle was the same.

It seems most high schools have by now adopted the GPA method of ranking students. That much I understood, but in recent years I became aware of a wrinkle that has been added to high school GPA calculation. At my kids’ high school, an honors class gets an extra half a point added to its grade, making a 4.5 the maximum grade point per credit for an honors class, while an Advanced Placement (AP) course gets a full extra point added. I suppose one motivation for this “weighting” of grades (as its called, though I’d have called it “incrementing,” since there’s not really a multiplicative factor involved) is to encourage students to take the more challenging courses without fear of bringing down their GPA. Of course it also encourages students that are competing for class ranking and to get into very competitive colleges to load up on AP courses. Given that weighting of courses seems to have become the rule, that then puts students at high schools that don’t offer AP courses at a disadvantage, which has led some colleges to look rather at “unweighted” GPA. Other college admissions offices may keep the weighting, but eliminate the non-academic classses such as gym, as they recompute the GPA.

Thus there can really be a number of GPA a high school student might be interested in knowing. A college student needn’t consider weighting, so far as I know, but a student planning to apply to graduate schools may need to be mainly concerned with grades in the major subject, possibly only the upper division courses. I know that as a physics undergraduate, I was given to believe that my GPA in upper divsion math and physics courses were what mainly mattered. It was these sorts of considerations that convinced me that a flexible GPA-calculating app that allowed the user to maintain a set of customizable formulas for doing the calculations would be worth developing, since from what I could tell there wasn’t such an app already being sold.

To obtain the flexibility I wanted, the app would need not only to do weighted and unweighted calculations, it would also have to provide an easy way to include or exclude certain courses such as non-academic ones or courses outside the major. So in addition to having standard, honors, and AP categories, I added an “other” option, just for ease in selecting whether to use a course in a given calculation. An example of a course definition is show in the app screen shot below.

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An example of a calculation method with the choices available is shown below. The user can create just those of the four possible definitions (weighted/unweighted with others included/excluded) wanted for the GPA records. When I say four, I’m assuming the other options of grade step and A+ handling would be the same for all calculations of interest, which might conceivably not be the case.

method

If even those four aren’t enough for a particular case, I’ve made it easy to duplicate a whole year’s (or other term’s) courses. Thus there could be two versions of the Sophomore Year with some courses absent from one of them. A simple on/off switch in the list of terms makes for easy switching between the two cases. This feature of optional inclusion of a term in the GPA calculation can also be used for calculating the GPA under different future scenarios. Note the “Best Case” and “Worst Case” Junior Year options in the screen shot below.

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An example of the courses defined for a full term is shown below.

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I also decided to make the app capable of keeping the grade records and GPA calculation methods for multiple students. All the GPA files stored on a given iPhone or iPod Touch are available for inspection and modification through selection from a list, as shown below.

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Finally the app description that was submitted is seen below. Details of how the app works are in the User’s Guide.

OnScreen GPA Pro provides these extra benefits:
• Gives you the power of multiple customized GPA calculation formulas to match any school’s method.
• Lets you keep grade records and calculate GPA for any number of students.
• Makes defining and calculating GPA for what-if scenarios a snap.
• Makes it easy to calculate GPA including or excluding a user-defined course category.
• Allows fractional credits.
• Simplifies entering new data by allowing duplication of existing courses, terms, and whole files.

See the OnScreen GPA Pro User Guide at http://nondummies.com/onscreengpapro.pdf to get a fuller picture of the app’s power and simplicity.

Say you’re a high school student and you’ve set up your GPA calculation to match the way your school does it. That’s what you need for determining class rank. But what if the college you’re applying to turns out to use a different method? Perhaps they don’t consider non-academic courses, such as gym. Perhaps they don’t use a GPA “weighted” to give extra grade points to honors and AP classes. With OnScreen GPA Pro, you just define a new method to match that school’s way and calculate GPA using whichever method you choose. There’s no point being limited to one or two calculation formulas, when this app lets you define one to match that of any school or to make one up to satisfy your own curiosity.

In addition to standard, honors, and AP categories for classes, there is a “wild card” category called “other”, which can be anything you choose it to be. You can define a calculation method to exclude the “other” category. For example, if you’re a college student considering graduate school, you may find that upper-division courses in your major are of greatest importance. OnScreen GPA Pro makes it a snap to calculate your GPA for just those courses. If you’re a high school student, you can peg your non-academic courses as “other” and define a calculation method that excludes them, while having another that includes them.

The app is flexible in another valuable way. You can easily include or exclude from your GPA any given terms or years you choose. In addition to making it easy to see how your GPA has changed from year to year, this gives you the power to make “what if” scenarios for the future. What if you make all A’s your senior year? Just define a best case senior year as one of your terms. Include it in your GPA calculation to see how much it can change where you currently stand. It’s as simple as tapping an on/off switch on your iPhone screen. Use this as a motivational tool.

If you really are a “GPA pro,” i.e., someone whose job involves accessing a lot of GPA, such as a high school guidance counselor or college admissions interviewer, then OnScreen GPA Pro’s ability to keep complete grade records with GPA for any number of students on your iPhone or iPod Touch is obviously a feature you can use. But even if you’re not a pro, you may appreciate the ability to record the grades for all of your children or for friends and siblings. The other benefit of having multiple files is that you can make a backup file, just in case you accidentally delete something from your record.

To make entering new terms and courses faster, OnScreen GPA Pro lets you duplicate ones you’ve already created. It’s faster to duplicate your whole junior year with the name senior year, then go through and edit the course names and grades than to create a new term called senior year and add courses to it one by one. But you can do it either way. Duplicate your whole file to make a backup or to use as a template for making a file for a friend with a similar schedule.

Taken together, the features outlined above put OnScreen GPA Pro in a class by itself.

OnScreen Pitch Count Now On Sale on iTunes App Store!

Saturday, August 29th, 2009

OnScreen Pitch Count, my iPhone “app” for recording pitch results in a baseball or softball game has been approved for placement on the iTunes App Store and is now available for purchase, in the Sports department, naturally. The past couple of posts here (OnScreen Pitch Count: An iPhone App Preview and How I Made a Quick-and-Dirty Six-Minute Demo Video of My iPhone App) have been devoted to describing the app and my efforts to get it ready.

The only way to sell an app for the iPhone and iPod Touch is through the App Store, and Apple has to approve individually every app that goes on sale there. The estimated time for this approval had been quoted as about two weeks when I submitted OnScreen Pitch Count on the night of August 12. I hurried to get it done then because I was going to be out town for five days, visiting family.

I spent the next couple of weeks wondering if I’d somehow introduced a fatal bug at the last minute (“impossible,” but still one thinks about the impossible sometimes) or if the reviewer at Apple might be someone that didn’t know the first thing about baseball. The evening of August 26 arrived, and OnScreen Pitch Count still hadn’t been approved. Then, almost two weeks to the hour since I’d submitted my app, I got the email saying it was now on sale on the iTunes app store.

Sure enough, within an hour or so the link embedded in my email worked to take me to the OnScreen Particle app’s display on the iTunes App Store. Sure, it’s too late in the baseball season to make many sales now, but it’s still a good feeling to know the app has been approved.

Let me quote a couple of paragraphs from the iTunes app description:

OnScreen Pitch Count from OnScreen Science, Inc. is an app for anyone wanting to have the pulse of a baseball or softball game at his or her fingertips. Pitching is the key to the game, and with OnScreen Pitch Count you’ll have data that even the tv analysts don’t. You’ll know how many pitches each pitcher in the game has thrown and exactly what the net results of those pitches have been.

Whether you’re watching your favorite team play, listening to a game on the radio, sitting in the stands at your child’s Little League game, or coaching a game in which extra pitching data could help you make the right decision, you’ll find OnScreen Pitch Count enhances your enjoyment of the game as it increases your understanding of it.

If you enjoy following baseball or softball, and especially if you coach it at any level, you should check OnScreen Pitch out. Even if you don’t really need it until next spring, you might as well get it and learn it now. I welcome comments and questions. See the email address in the right hand column.

UPDATE: See also “IPhone App Updates and Experiences” and “OnScreen Pitch Count 1.3 Is Now on the iTunes App Store”.

OnScreen Pitch Count: An iPhone App Preview

Wednesday, August 5th, 2009

I’ve been explaining the infrequency of my postings here as due to the time I’ve spent working on an iPhone “app.” Now that it’s about to be submitted to the iTunes App Store for inclusion on that exclusive online site for selling (or even giving away) iPhone apps, it seems I should give my devoted readers a preview of the app: OnScreen Pitch Count, the first iPhone app from OnScreen Science, Inc.

Pitch Count? “How could you take that long to make a pitch counter?” you may be thinking (and perhaps “How is it better than the mechanical clicker kind you can buy at the hardware store?”). Hopefully a description of what the app can do will answer both those questions.

The screenshot below shows the main display and the buttons one taps to record pitch results. Incidentally, I considered naming the app OnScreen Pitch Results since it more accurately describes what the app keeps track of, but that name is two characters longer than allowed before being truncated in the App Store listings, so I’m going with Pitch Count, which may be better anyway. The name of the current pitcher is displayed at the top. This example is from a moment in this year’s MLB All Star game.

The buttons in the lower green area are the ones that record each pitch result. One of my first tasks was to determine just what I wanted to keep track of. I referred to my own experience as a Little League coach and also as an interested baseball fan. I rejected the level of detail that would include pitch location and pitch type (curve ball, fast ball, etc.) as being more than anyone but a pitching coach or scout would probably want or be able to handle, not even considering the difficulty in coming up with a user-friendly way of recording that much information for each pitch.

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Using a basic knowledge of baseball and some trial and error, I came up with the buttons that are displayed above. In keeping track of strikes thrown we need not only to record pitches that add to the strike total in a given at bat but also the pitches that result in foul balls after two strikes have already been recorded or that result in balls being put into play, leading either to an out being recorded or to the batter reaching base. A great deal of thought and experiment went into choosing the size and placement of the buttons, which I have found to be easy to use in the actual flow of a game.

The bottom two rows of buttons are for recording pitches not put into play: balls and the three kinds of strikes. The Walk and Strikeout buttons are not enabled until four balls or three strikes have been registered. I found from experience that putting in the extra step of recording a walk or strikeout reduced the chance of error and made the situation that much clearer. The Undo button can be tapped to undo the results of as many as two pitches, for example for changing a ball into a called strike after a hasty tap made before the umpire had spoken. It can also, of course, be used to cancel an accidental tap of any button. When three strikes have been recorded, the Strikeout button is highlighted to indicate the next step, and all other ball and strike buttons are disabled until the strikeout is recorded or the strike call is undone. At any time, only the buttons that have meaning are enabled. For example, if there are no runners on base, the Basepath Out and Run buttons are disabled. At important steps such as recording the third out, the next button to be tapped is indicated by highlighting (as mentioned previously for recording a strikeout).

Above the two lower rows of buttons are those relevant to balls put into play and possible results with runners on base. As currently programmed, hits and errors are recorded but without the specific type of hit (single etc.). The Out button is tapped whenever a ball hit by the batter results in the batter being put out before reaching base or in a baserunner being forced out. A basepath out is recorded when a runner is put out not as the result of a hit ball, say caught stealing. In the case of a double play, both an out and a basepath out are recorded. This system of buttons keeps the hits, errors, outs, and current baserunners straight. The Other OB button is used to record batters reaching after being hit by a pitch and so on. It even has the option of the batter reaching first base after a dropped third strike, properly recording the strikeout while removing the out.

The middle yellow section above shows the current situation in the inning: outs, runners on base, and the ball and strike count on the hitter. The cumulative game totals of balls and strikes (including balls put in play etc.) for the current pitcher are shown above that section. A tap of the Details button brings up the cumulative game totals for pitch results, runs allowed, baserunners, etc. for the current pitcher, as shown in the screen shot below.

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The pitcher whose results are shown above pitched only one inning as closer, but the same totals for every pitcher in the game can be brought up for inspection by a tap of the Review button followed by a scroll and a tap to select the pitcher from the list of those recorded (see below). All pitchers appearing in the game for either team can be recorded. Or, a single pitcher appearing at any point in the game can be followed alone, depending on the user’s interest. All of the data recorded in a given game is saved on the iPhone or iPod Touch and can be reviewed at any time with the OnScreen Pitch Count app.

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When I started to work on this project there were no competing apps that I was aware of, but since then a few have appeared. OnScreen Pitch Count lies in between some that seem to be really barebones counters of balls and strikes (with limitations on the number of pitchers) and much more detailed “pitching scout” type apps that record more data but are aimed at tracking individual pitchers over time. I think OnScreen Pitch Count should find  a comfortable place in this niche of pitch recording apps. I’m pretty confident it can more than hold its own in usability and usefulness. As far as I’ve been able to tell from scanning app descriptions, OnScreen Pitch Count is the only app that properly charges runs to the pitcher that allowed the scoring runner to reach base even when the run scored after a relief pitcher had come into the game.

Of course, interrupting the pitch-recording to answer the iPhone or to play a game between innings has no effect on OnScreen Pitch Count, and it will resume right where it left off whenever it’s pressed into service again. This happens automatically for pauses of up to an hour, but you can resume any unfinished game at any time, whether after a long rain delay or after you’ve paused a game tape for days.

How much will it cost? I’m leaning toward $2.99. It would be worth a lot more than that to some people, but the way mass appeal apps have been forced to fight for attention on the App Store has led to popular games being sold for 99¢. OnScreen Pitch Count is not competing in the popular game market, but the depression in game prices has led to iPhone users’ expecting very low prices on anything they buy.

I should mention that I found in my testing of OnScreen Pitch Count, watching both local softball games and televised major league games, that the spectator experience was enhanced by following with such close attention and having so much information literally at my fingertips. I would have loved to have had the information when I was coaching Little League. It was a lot of work to program OnScreen Pitch Count, though the development tools Apple supplies are excellent. Further improvements and my next app (I have an idea!) will be easier, assuming I get on with it before I forget what I’ve learned.

In a day or two after I post this I should have more information about OnScreen Pitch Count up at this link: http://nondummies.com. I plan to have a video demonstration.

UPDATE: See also “OnScreen Pitch Count Now On Sale on iTunes App Store!”, “IPhone App Updates and Experiences”, and “OnScreen Pitch Count 1.3 Is Now on the iTunes App Store”.